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Thread: ECW The Night the Line was Crossed Review

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    NWA ECW The Night the Line was Crossed Review

    The Night the Line was Crossed
    February 5, 1994



    The tape opens up with Tod Gordon in his office. Watch this tape to find out why everyone is talking about ECW!

    Mr. Hughes w/Jason vs Wildman Sal Bellomo
    Bellomo, the WWE jobber from the 80s, had found himself used on a regular basis during ECWís first couple of years. However, as ECW nears the transition from Eastern Championship Wrestling to Extreme Championship Wrestling, heíd soon found himself out of a job. He would briefly return to ECW as a member of The FBI in 1996 though. Meanwhile, Hughes had joined ECW a few months ago after finishing up with the WWE at the end of the summer 1993. Thereís not much to this match other than clobbering from both men. Despite Bellomo being a big man, he was booked as the underdog who struggled to get Hughes off of his feet. After mounting a brief comeback, Bellomo was tripped up by Jason, allowing Hughes to drive his knee into Bellomo before finishing him off with a lazy looking Boss Man Slam. A low effort match that still couldnít be bothered to truly put Hughes over strong. *

    The Sandman and Tommy Cairo vs The Pitbull and Rockin Rebel w/Jason - Double Dog Collar Match
    Apparently The Sandman, and by extension his then-bff Cairo, had been feuding with Jason and his clients for awhile. This match was set-up when Sandman was hanged by a steel chain. Cairo was a pretty big star for ECW during their Eastern days with his big feud happening probably pretty soon. Sandman is still rocking the surfer gimmick. The Pitbull is just Pitbull #1. Although The Pitbulls did pop up in ECW in 1992, Pitbull #1 had just recently returned and would be on his own for a bit before Pitbull #2 would join him. Sadly, Rockin Rebelís legacy these days is how he killed his wife and then himself in 2018. This was okay. Rebel and Sandman were chained together while Cairo and Pitbull were chained together. Sandman and Rebel had a bit of a fun brawl mostly in the crowd including a pair of table bumps, both of which saw Sandman put through tables. Cairo and Pitbull mostly stayed in the ring, but thanks to some early chair shots, Cairo was busted open. Despite looking as if they had the match nearly won, the heels found themselves abruptly beaten with a belly-to-belly suplex from Cairo to Pitbull with Sandman having the quick thought to wrap his chain around Pitbullís legs to assist in Cairo pin. Hardly a remarkable match, but I canít really complain about this one. Itís interesting to see what ECW views to be hardcore at the start of 1994 and what they would even a year later. ** ľ


    After the match, the heels jump the babyfaces, hanging Sandman in the process before Sandman makes the save causing the heels to run off. The feud must continue! Except the feud wouldnít continue. A couple of weeks later on ECW TV, Jason would blind Sandman with some unknown liquid causing Sandman to accidentally strike his wife, Miss Peaches. This kicked off a new attitude for Sandman, not caring about Peaches, instead more concerned about himself while his buddy, Cairo, was left to help Peaches to the back. From there, Sandman officially ditched the surfer gimmick and adapted the Sandman gimmick that heís best known for. His new attitude would cause a rift between him and Cairo kicking off a long feud between the two. So I guess you can say that the above match was the end of an era for The Sandman.

    A bit of a WWE Network note on The Rockin Rebel. When you search his name, various matches and segments will come up, but the name of the videos have all been edited to remove any mention of Rebel. For example, the June 21st episode of Hardcore features a Taz vs Rebel match, but the video is now titled "Tazmaniac competes in singles action". However, it seems as if these changes were hastily done because the description of the episode includes, ďThe Tazmaniac faces Rockin Rebel.Ē From what I can tell, thereís only one video that still has Rebelís name in the title, but itís "Jason, Pitbull, & Rebel are angry", which makes me presume that whoever did these changes did a keyword search of ďRockin RebelĒ, but was unaware of the times when Rebel may only be referenced as ďRebelĒ. Perhaps no one cares about this, but I find it a bit interesting to see when the WWE Network only puts minimal effort into something that isnít a very big deal when compared to when you search ďChris BenoitĒ and all you see is ďSorry, we couldn't find what you were looking for. Please check the spelling or try another searchĒ. I would say itís easier for the WWE Network to remove mentions of Benoitís name since the WWE Network wasnít a thing when Benoit was alive, but an event like The Night the Line was Crossed was only added to the WWE Network after Rebelís death, but his name still shows up in just the description of the show.

    The Public Enemy vs The Bruise Brothers - Falls Count Anywhere
    Oh dear. This looks awful. You can really tell that ECW was in a transitional period at this point and hadnít quite found the regular extremeness that they became known for yet. Joey Styles made such a big deal about this being a gimmick tag match even though this is the style that would become the norm for garbage tag matches. Table bumps is something that is really standing out on this show because numerous times wrestlers attempt them, but the table rarely breaks fully. Iím guessing that at a certain point, ECW put actual thought into prepping tables so that theyíd break easily? Anyways, this came across as a long squash as The Bruise Brothers absolutely destroyed Public Enemy. Both in and out of the ring, all Rocco and Grunge did for the majority was getting their asses kicked. At one point, Rocco was slammed on Joey Stylesí table, which I feel as if that was supposed to feel like a big deal. The ending is pretty abrupt though. One Harris Brother is blinded by some powder from Grunge while the other is knocked out with a 2x4 shot to the back from Rocco. Both Rocco and Grunge cover and they pick up the win in a match where they basically only hit two moves the entire time. This wasnít the train wreck that I was expecting. I imagine a big part of that is because it was only eight minutes long, not the normal much longer length that Iím more prone to see in 1996-1997. The only really bad aspect of the match was Styles claiming you canít see this sort of action in the WWE or WCW. Meanwhile, itís the first half of 1994. The amazing Cactus Jack vs The Nasty Boys program has already kicked off and would be producing ECW style brawls that completely out performs the actual ECW brawls. * ĺ

    Tommy Dreamer vs Jimmy Snuka w/Hunter Q. Robbins III
    Dreamer debuted for ECW in late 1993 and is still in his suspenders gear. Meanwhile, Snuka had been one of the top stars for ECW during their Eastern days where he was the first ECW Champion and first ECW TV Champion, well...sort of. There had been two TV Champions prior to Snuka, but Snuka winning the title tournament was the first of the Hardcore TV era. This match was rather frustrating because the angle of the match was actually good, itís just that the actual match sucked. The problem is that so little happened. Thereís a ton of stalling at the start of the match with Snuka focusing on a small group of fans. It takes forever before thereís finally some physical action and even then, very little happens. Snuka is still too busy stalling and as Dreamer takes a nasty bump to the outside, it was an incredibly one sided match. Where the angle gets interesting is that Snuka goes for the Superfly Splash, but since he takes awhile to go for the lazy cover, Dreamer does the unthinkable and kicks out. Snuka canít believe it. He briefly beats on Dreamer some more before hitting another couple Superfly Splashes focusing more on hurting Dreamer than trying to pin him. The third Superfly Splash did the trick and Snuka wins this one sided contest with a ton of stalling. This wasnít fun to watch at all. ľ *


    After the match, Snuka opts to hit another Superfly Splash on Dreamer. Poor Dreamer is left spitting up blood. When the referee tries to stop Snuka, Snuka attacks him. When Snuka goes up top yet again, Tod Gordon ran out to try and stop him. This time, Snuka came off of the top with a double ax handle to Gordon. This post-match angle was loads better than the actual match.

    Kevin Sullivan and The Tazmaniac w/Woman vs The Sheik and Pat Tanaka
    Well this certainly comes across as a random match. To the best of my knowledge, this is the only time The Original Sheik ever wrestled in ECW. Taz debuted for ECW back in October at the same time as Sabu and Tommy Dreamer. He quickly joined forces with Kevin Sullivan where they had already won the ECW Tag Titles and feuded with the likes of Pat Tanaka/Paul Diamond and The Bruise Brothers. However, the titles are currently held up due to a controversial finish of a Taz/Sullivan vs Bruise Brothers match from the night before. Sullivan and Taz would end up regaining the titles the next month though. The fact that ECW purposely took the belts away from Sullivan and Taz makes me wonder if it was done solely because of who theyíre wrestling tonight. This match may be the most unusual structured tag match Iíve ever seen. Itís two matches going at once as Sullivan and Sheik fight entirely on the outside of the ring with both quickly getting bloodied. Meanwhile, Tazmaniac and Tanaka ďFoughtĒ in the ring, but all of their wrestling is Taz locking in various leg holds on Tanaka. Do something! Instead, it all built up to Sheik throwing a fireball at Tazís back, which the camera missed the majority of because ECW only had one camera. That allowed Tanaka to jump on Taz and score the pinfall. With Sullivan and Sheik pummeling each other and Taz wasting time by slapping on leg holds, this was such a low effort performance from everyone. I presume Sheik wasnít in any condition to take any bumps at this stage of his career, so Heyman decided to throw together this sham of a match. Ĺ *

    After the match, Sheik and Sullivan continued fighting because they clearly weren't caring about the match.

    Mike Awesome vs JT Smith
    As this is before Smithís infamous botch that caused him to believe he was Italian, heís just your ordinary Philly boy here. For what this match was, it was simply awesome. Smith tried to attack before the bell, but Awesome quickly began destroying Smith with a lariat, overhead belly-to-belly suplex, and a tope suicida that bent Smithís back across the steel railing in a crazy spot. Back in the ring, Awesome looked to put Smith away with a power bomb, but Smith countered into a small package, shocking everyone with the pinfall. Considering Smith is your ECW regular and (Sadly) Awesome isnít, it makes sense to put Smith over while keeping Awesome looking like an unstoppable monster in case he returns any time soon. A thoroughly entertaining squash. SQUASH.


    After the match, Awesome took out his frustrations on the referee, dropping him with a pair of power bombs. From there, Awesome climbed to the top rope for an Awesome Splash, but the top rope ends up snapping. Awesome splats HARD on the mat. It takes a while, but Awesome finally got to his feet, threw a turnbuckle pad in anger, and left. At the conclusion of the match, I was questioning why Heyman didnít try harder to keep Awesome around at this point, but after that botch, the very best thing for Awesome was to just return to FMW and give it time for the ECW fans to forget about that botch. That botch completely killed off the mystique of the Awesome character. How is anyone supposed to be scared of Awesome after seeing him get humiliated so badly? I feel bad for Awesome, but I was also unable to stop from laughing when it happened. One of the most humiliating botches Iíve ever seen.


    Terry Funk © vs Shane Douglas w/Sherri vs Sabu w/Paul E. Dangerously & 911 - NWA-ECW Title
    One of the most important matches in ECW history. While itís not the first multiple man match in pro wrestling history, you can actually find some four-way elimination tag matches from Mid-South all the way back in 1985, this three-way dance is what popularized the multiple man match and helped make it a regular thing in wrestling. The narrative for this match is that itís not only revolutionary, but itís also one of the very best matches of its time. The reality is that with 2019 eyes, I donít think that the match is special. In fact, Iíd go as far as to say that it was actively a bad match. One key problem is the length. Itís an hour long draw. The fact that the previous month saw a 45 minute time limit draw between Funk and Douglas makes me think that Heyman booked such a long draw because it would create a lot more buzz than had they just worked a more trim length match. This is a problem though as the legacy is that itís this amazing match between three men, but so little of the match featured all three men. The rules of the match were a little funky. It began with Douglas vs Sabu with the idea that once one of them is eliminated, theyíd immediately earn a title shot against Funk. However, if after fifteen minutes, there isnít a fall, Funk will come out anyways. Now, ECWís three-way dances are known for one of the wrestlers often taking their time entering the match, but making it official in such an unusual way wasnít all that interesting. During this fifteen minute stretch, Sabu mostly focused on the arm of Douglas. Then right before Funk was set to come out, Sabu apparently injured his leg during a moonsault attempt into the crowd where Douglas moved out of the way with Sabu crashing through a table. Douglas very briefly worked over the knee before 911 carried Sabu to the back just as Terry Funk entered the match. The result of that is for over fifteen minutes, the match is now just Funk vs Douglas. This segment of the match is where the match really lost me as Funk hit a piledriver and a DDT on the exposed floor and then a second DDT on a stack of chairs inside of the ring. Thatís an injury angle, yet Douglas doesnít even sell it as anything special to go along with his now forgotten arm injury caused by Sabu. Douglas not even getting busted open during these spots doesnít help either. How am I supposed to care about any of the punishment in the match when three huge spots like that are ignored? In this sixty minute match, you have to go more than thirty minutes (!!!) before you finally see action with all three men when Sabu finally returns around the thirty-two minute mark. Speaking of Sabu, he just didnít look good in the match. So many of his big spots were blown. Now, if he legitimately injured his knee, maybe you can say that some of the reasons why he botched so much was because he was hurt. Regardless, Sabu was a clear negative in the entire match. During this next ten minute period from thirty-five to forty-five minute mark, some of it was wasted with Funk going to the Eagleís Nest to get on the mic to challenge Sabu and Douglas to fight up top. The problem is that Funk grabbed Joey Stylesí headset, so he wasnít actually talking on the house mic. So what we ended up seeing was Funk challenging his opponents to a fight while Sabu and Douglas are apparently ignoring it in the ring. Throughout all of the match, Sherri, Dangerously, and 911 had been getting involved, but ever since Funk came into the bout, he had been alone. This changes after Douglas destroyed Funk with chair shots prompting Funkís buddies, The Bad Breed, to come out to the ring to help Funk to the back and then kick off an unofficial tag match of The Bad Breed vs Douglas/Sabu for almost five minutes. Again, for a match whose legacy was kicking off the popularization of multiple man matches, so little of it featured all three men. Finally, Funk returned at the fifty minute mark and Bad Breed left, allowing for the final ten minutes to just be the three men actually in the match. Itís...fine. Thereís about a billion pin attempts especially once the ring announcer began announcing how close we were coming to the time limit. Of course, it ends up going the time limit at sixty minutes resulting in a draw. Who doesnít love wasting sixty minutes of their day for a match that doesnít have a winner? Overall, this is such a difficult match to properly judge because in some ways, itís awful and itís shit. In other ways, itís one of the most important matches of the 90s. It popularized the multiple man match, gave ECW a signature match of the three-way dance, that signature match was carried over to ROH by Gabe, and helped ECW gain a lot more attention. While I respect what ECW did in this match and all that occurred because of it, I also think itís the textbook example of an ECW match that doesnít work outside of its time frame. Still, you canít claim that this didnít feel important. * Ĺ


    Backstage, Joey Styles kicks off a ďPress conferenceĒ in front of the press that are TOTALLY right behind the cameras. First up is the ECW Champion, Terry Funk. He cuts a promo while crying, expressing his frustration with the business today and how WCW and WWE arenít respecting the industry, but ECW cares. Up next is Paul E. Dangerously with Sabu having to be restrained by 911 and another handler after Sabu spots a table. In a pretty funny gag, Dangerously repeatedly instructs 911 not to let Sabu see the table as if Sabu will be a tame animal as long as he doesnít see that trigger. Anyways, Dangerously calls tonight a massive conspiracy by Funk and Douglas and that Sabu deserves the ECW Title! Finally, itís time for Shane Douglas and Sherri to talk. Douglas brings up how at various points in the match, both Sabu and Funk were forced to go to the back because of what he did to them. As a result, he deserves to be named ECW Champion. That brings back Terry Funk who despite cutting a calm promo, isnít pleased with Douglas calling him an old man. Funk ends up handing Douglas the ECW Title, citing that it will be fun taking the belt back from Douglas. Douglas, not too fond of that idea tosses the title at Funkís head and we have a brawl. A bunch of wrestlers appear to pull apart the top two ECW stars while Tod Gordon calls for police. As cheesy as this ďPress conferenceĒ was, I thought it came across great. Itís a real sign of the times, but Douglas cussing was made out to be something that was entirely shocking. This is pro wrestling, it caters to children and this man is dropping swear words?! Whoa. As much as I didnít care for the three-way match, the characters and feuds displayed in this segment was great. It made me want to see a Funk/Douglas match, despite knowing that I may not actually enjoy it. ECWís track record may not be perfect, but when they deliver on an angle, it works so well. I think itís all because everyone involved in this segment came across as completely believable. Itís fantastic stuff!

    Overall
    As difficult as it may be, to properly judge this event, I think itís important to try and judge it based on what a typical indie wrestling event from the early 90s would have been like. Theyíre still just some little territory associated with the practical dead NWA. As a result, thereís a lot of crummy wrestling filled with guys who the big companies have no desire to sign or old timers that no longer have much value. With that being said, what makes The Night the Line was Crossed and the period in general interesting is that it clearly feels as if things are changing. Paul Heyman had only been booking ECW for five months, but the roster is changing. Guys like Taz, Sabu, Dreamer, and The Public Enemy have all debuted. Shane Douglasí promo at the end of the show was ECW starting to really push the limits to help make ECW into more of an adult geared product. Itís laughable now, but Joey Stylesí over the top reaction to Shaneís cussing emphasized the fact that this was not normal language for a wrestling program. On a mostly forgettable show, the main event remains one of the biggest matches in ECW history. As I said, it wasnít the first time a multiple man match happened in wrestling, but Sabu/Funk/Douglas is pretty much entirely responsible for why you still see multiple man matches to this day. Hell, the last WWE PPV at the time of writing this review featured a triple threat in the main event. Obviously, thereís a lot of steps to go from the three-way dance in 1994 to the triple threat in 2019, particularly the WWE having to give in and adapt a gimmick created by another company, but that 2019 match wouldnít have happened without this 1994 match. Granted, I canít pretend to think that Funk/Sabu/Douglas was a good match. It was structured awful, Sabu was a botching machine, and it was ultimately an hour wasted without a victor. I still acknowledge that itís a gigantic match in the history of wrestling. Considering how much attention it brought to the tiny Eastern Championship Wrestling, it could very well be the most important match in ECW history. Quality wise, the only match that Iíd say is actually worth watching is Mike Awesomeís awesome squash against JT Smith. Sadly, itís also a match with a horrific botch afterward that killed off Awesomeís monster aura. Unless you just want to see what ECW was like before they went ďExtremeĒ, I canít recommend checking out this show. The Night the Line was Crossed was an event where the matches failed to deliver, but the booking of the feuds and characters showed that Heyman was onto something gold.

  2. #2
    American Ninja

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    Re: ECW The Night the Line was Crossed Review

    What an extremely interesting review of a show that really needed to be covered(I never covered it myself in my American Hardcore Theatre project). I don't post nearly enough in these threads because really I'm just not into the pro wrestling state of mind that I was in for a while a few years back. Really over on the other board PW I was a part of a group that discussed ECW a lot for about 6 years, which was almost as long as they existed in real time back in the day. So I kind of burned myself out on talking about wrestling on the internet.

    But something about a Saturday night with nothing to do, here for the past month or so I've been watching through ECW 1994 Hardcore TV episodes that I downloaded a long time ago but never got around to watching. I can't think of anything better to watch on nights like these, smoking herb and sipping coffee while working on some nerd shit on my laptop(AFL fan fiction!), it's usually Ancient Aliens or some old football videos I've dug up, but here lately it's been ECW and I've been really enjoying it.

    Like I said in the other thread I never really got into 1994 ECW. I've read a lot about it and seen a show here or there. There was a big jump in quality in 1995 and for a long time I just never bothered to get into anything before that because most of what I had seen was mostly terrible. Like really terrible. One of the elements that I love about the ECW story was just how much and how quickly they improved and evolved from 93 to 95-96-97.

    I had no idea about this Rockin' Rebel murder suicide in 2018, that's terrible. Interesting the way they had to edit the WWE Network because of that. Info like this makes these reviews 5 stars, the best ECW reviews I've seen really.

    I actually kinda dug the Bruise Brothers vs Public Enemy brawl. I don't know why but I've always had a thing for Public Enemy, I guess it goes back to my strange fascination with people being put through tables in pro wrestling. There is some deep psychological satisfaction I used to get from seeing somebody going through a table and my first impression of Public Enemy was when they were in WCW, so every time they wrestled in WCW it was like guaranteed table breakage. So I liked them but then I grew to love them when I seen their ECW run and the character and charm they had in that setting.

    I get a kick out of ECW now watching these shows whenever they go over the top with how much better they were than WCW or WWF or how boisterous they would go all the time with things, like "This was the greatest ____ in pro wrestling history" all the time, especially during this time in 1994 where it was like my favorite year ever in WWF and WCW was also pretty great up to Spring Stampede at least. They really poured on the hype and they were ornery for such a small time rinky dink promotion but I fucking love it though. I really get a kick out of Shane Douglas calling out Bret Hart on some of these episodes(also calls out Flair a lot), that's really cool to me. Always loved it when ECW champs would call out the WWF and WCW champs.

    Really good review to read I enjoyed it. It wasn't a good show really but it is an interesting one because this was really the show that kickstarted ECW into becoming what it would become. This show was a big seller, it was their first big VHS tape that people were going out of their way to get, they were getting orders from all around the country for this tape. So this show kind of kickstarted ECW's business model with their VHS tapes being like their PPV. They would build up to these shows like this to sell on VHS and the Hardcore TV shows would be like infomercials for them. Like after a show like this sometimes they would show still pictures of the big matches instead of video footage like what WWF/WCW do for their PPV's on their weeklies that followed, to get you to buy the tape(or in WWF/WCW's case the replay on PPV).

    Also interesting to think about why ECW couldn't get a bigger home video distribution deal and how they started getting hot right around the time the VHS boom died out but they fizzled out right around the time DVD's where taking off(by the time they finally got ECW DVDs/VHS on video store shelves with a nationwide distribution deal they were going out of business). Like their business model with VHS tapes would have worked way better in the late 80's or earlier 90's when there was this historic demand for home video content(video stores popping up everywhere needing tapes on shelves). I think by the time ECW started picking up in 94-95 the home video market kinda cooled down because the big chain stores sterilized the industry and put most of the independent mom and pop shops out of business by that point.
    Last edited by ShinobiMusashi; 12-15-2019 at 07:46 AM.

  3. #3

    Re: ECW The Night the Line was Crossed Review

    Quote Originally Posted by ShinobiMusashi View Post
    So I kind of burned myself out on talking about wrestling on the internet.
    While I've never been burned out on talking wrestling, I think you can tell based on what I'm reviewing, and more particularly when I'm not reviewing something, whether I'm burned out on a specific company or time period. The nice thing about wrestling, especially these days, is that there's a million companies and time periods you have the ability to watch. In this case, 1994 ECW has piqued my interest. If I end up growing tired of it before finishing the year, I'll just switch to something else.

    Like I said in the other thread I never really got into 1994 ECW. I've read a lot about it and seen a show here or there. There was a big jump in quality in 1995 and for a long time I just never bothered to get into anything before that because most of what I had seen was mostly terrible. Like really terrible. One of the elements that I love about the ECW story was just how much and how quickly they improved and evolved from 93 to 95-96-97.
    Initially what I thought made the difference when it comes to the shift in quality in 1995 was the roster, but I think it's more than that. I'll go into more with my next review, but NWA-ECW takes the safe approach with their all of their matches following 1-2 formulas. NWA-ECW badly needed some variety and I feel like ECW got that in 1995. Granted, it also didn't hurt that ECW added Benoit, Guerrero, Malenko, and Scorpio to the roster.

    I had no idea about this Rockin' Rebel murder suicide in 2018, that's terrible. Interesting the way they had to edit the WWE Network because of that. Info like this makes these reviews 5 stars, the best ECW reviews I've seen really.
    Rebel's death didn't get much attention. Checking out WC's news and rumors section, I can't even find a single mention of his death last year. If it had been a bigger scale story, I imagine the WWE Network would have put in more energy into expunging him from the Network. I do wish that the Network would use the approach they did with Rebel and use it on Chris Benoit. I get that the WWE doesn't want to promote Benoit, but it wouldn't be promoting if you can search his name and you get a bunch of results with titles of videos resembling "Triple Threat Match: World Heavyweight Title".

    I actually kinda dug the Bruise Brothers vs Public Enemy brawl. I don't know why but I've always had a thing for Public Enemy, I guess it goes back to my strange fascination with people being put through tables in pro wrestling. There is some deep psychological satisfaction I used to get from seeing somebody going through a table and my first impression of Public Enemy was when they were in WCW, so every time they wrestled in WCW it was like guaranteed table breakage. So I liked them but then I grew to love them when I seen their ECW run and the character and charm they had in that setting.
    The antics of The Public Enemy can be pretty fun, but especially in ECW, the matches aren't too exciting for me as they follow the garbage tag match structure that I hate so much. Even though ECW clearly used The Public Enemy better, I think I prefer their booking in WCW where they were a lower attraction and their matches were a lot shorter.

    I get a kick out of ECW now watching these shows whenever they go over the top with how much better they were than WCW or WWF or how boisterous they would go all the time with things, like "This was the greatest ____ in pro wrestling history" all the time, especially during this time in 1994 where it was like my favorite year ever in WWF and WCW was also pretty great up to Spring Stampede at least. They really poured on the hype and they were ornery for such a small time rinky dink promotion but I fucking love it though.
    Some of ECW's claims were so ludicrous with the worst ones being whenever they tried to claim something that obviously wasn't true. I think it was a 1997 show I was watching that Styles claimed that you can't see high flying action like that in either of the big two. Meanwhile, WCW was having the luchadores on TV every week at that point.

    Also interesting to think about why ECW couldn't get a bigger home video distribution deal and how they started getting hot right around the time the VHS boom died out but they fizzled out right around the time DVD's where taking off(by the time they finally got ECW DVDs/VHS on video store shelves with a nationwide distribution deal they were going out of business). Like their business model with VHS tapes would have worked way better in the late 80's or earlier 90's when there was this historic demand for home video content(video stores popping up everywhere needing tapes on shelves). I think by the time ECW started picking up in 94-95 the home video market kinda cooled down because the big chain stores sterilized the industry and put most of the independent mom and pop shops out of business by that point.
    I own a few ECW VHS/DVDs, but I think I bought them all after ECW had been out of business for some amount of time. I was still seeing some of those commercial tapes in stores as late as 2006.

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