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Thread: The Ask Jim Thread

  1. #2821

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    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    I was watching a video on forgotten Ruthless Aggression era stars and it made me think about some things. Which one of these Ruthless Aggression midcarders do you think had the most potential to really break through to the main event, and when would have been the best time to really establish them there?

    1. Carlito
    2. Mr. Kennedy
    3. MVP
    4. Shelton Benjamin
    5. Chris Masters

  2. #2822

    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by The EC View Post
    I was watching a video on forgotten Ruthless Aggression era stars and it made me think about some things. Which one of these Ruthless Aggression midcarders do you think had the most potential to really break through to the main event, and when would have been the best time to really establish them there?
    I'll give a bit more of a detailed answer rather than just pick which one had the best chance.

    1. Carlito
    Carlito is a tricky one in that he had something really good going on, but is such a clear gimmick act worthy of being in the main event? Out of these five names, I have the least amount of belief that he could have been a main eventer. If he was ever going to be a main eventer, WWECW was the way to go. The start of WWECW was perfect since Carlito was in the middle of a push on Raw, but struggling to break into the main event due to John Cena and DX being higher than him. I don't see why Carlito couldn't have been given Big Show's WWECW push.

    2. Mr. Kennedy
    Out of the five, Kennedy is the best possible one to be pushed into the main event. It nearly happened multiple times, but injuries kept happening at the worst possible times. The easiest time to thrust him into the main event would have been 2007. Since his injury ended up being far less severe than originally believed to be, he could have just been off of TV for a couple of months and then returned as a surprise and maybe even cashed in his MITB. He ended up returning to the ring just before Great American Bash 2007, so just have him wait until GAB where he'd attack whichever World Champion he wanted to go after after they won their scheduled match and have the PPV end with Kennedy as a new World Champion.

    3. MVP
    If the WWE wanted to, they could have pushed MVP into becoming a main eventer. He's only behind Kennedy for the easiest main eventers from this list. For when to push him into the main event, I'd go with after a draft so that whatever show he's on, it feels fresh with this new wrestler looking to take advantage of this shake up. 2010 Smackdown seems fine since they already pushed awful heels like Jack Swagger and Kane to the WHC.

    4. Shelton Benjamin
    Benjamin is unlikely, but not as unlikely as Carlito. It seemed like the WWE cared about Benjamin at times, but then would quickly forget about him. I can't see him as ever being someone the WWE would push as a main eventer for an extended amount of time, but maybe for a brief push during some of the down months of post-Summerslam/pre-Road to Wrestlemania. The easiest thing to do is just do what I did with Carlito and have Shelton be the early main eventer on WWECW, but since I already chose that for Carlito, I'll pick something else. Shelton was involved in the championship scramble at Unforgiven 2008. I think it could be believable for the WWE to give him a title as long as he's not booked as the top guy. So he steals a pinfall in the championship scramble with seconds left in the match and shocks everyone by winning the title. For the next few months, Benjamin, as US and WWE Champion, keeps lucking into retaining the title through various BS means including count-out, DQ, ect. The entire time Hardy and Hunter is chasing him, leading into some big gimmick match at Armageddon 2008 where Shelton just can't run away to cause him to lose the title. The next SD, a complaining Benjamin gets talked into defending the US Title, which he gets surprised and pinned within seconds to lose that title too. Eh, it could be a fun angle.

    5. Chris Masters
    I think it's clear the WWE wanted Masters to be a main eventer, but he was brought up way too early and couldn't deliver. Then when he returned, he had all of the skills, but Vince no longer cared about him. But being someone McMahon once wanted to have as a main eventer still makes him a better choice than Benjamin or Carlito. If he was ever going to receive a main event push, post WM 22 would have been the time for it. He splits up with Carlito, destroys him, and gets placed in the WWE Title match with Cena, Edge, and Triple H at Backlash. He can receive another WWE Title shot against RVD at Vengeance 2006, since that was another successful title defense for the champion. Since Cena has to be a bit busy with Edge, that's the time to bring back Carlito and have Masters beat him at Summerslam. Then once Rated RKO comes together to feud against DX, instead of booking Cena in that weird feud against the other World Champions, he can feud exclusively with Chris Masters until the end of 2006. With everything going crazy with injuries on SD post-WM 23, Masters could have jumped to SD after WM and won the WHC where he'd have a proper long reign. Quality wise, this push wouldn't have been great, but this was the same time period that Khali got a push, so clearly quality didn't matter much.

    So to quickly rank the five for most potential of receiving a main event push:

    5. Carlito
    4. Shelton Benjamin
    3. Chris Masters
    2. MVP
    1. Mr. Kennedy

  3. #2823
    Curtain Jerker

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    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post

    Is there even a point to looking up to see if it's Bret or not? The only Summerslam where he clearly didn't have the MOTN was 1995, but even then he still pulled a really good match out of a green Kane. Besides 1995, the only year where it's not a lock that Bret had the MOTN (Including 2010 technically) was 1993. Bret wins this without even bothering to think about anyone else and chances are, no one will ever be able to compete with him.
    I'd say Bret vs Doink and especially his match with Lawler are far and away the best matches of Summer Slam 1993. I just watched it again recently in anticipation of the next OSW Review on the show.

    The Steiners vs The Heavenly Bodies is decent, but it's mainly just the Steiners trying to do as much shit as possible in 8 minutes and there's some sloppiness that brings the match down. I think they would've had a much better match with even just another 5 mins to tell some semblance of a story. 2.5/5

    Then there's Shawn Michaels vs Mr Perfect which was a disappointing match. Perfect just didn't work at all as a babyface. Again, there's some sloppiness to this match which brings it down. Both guys were having much better matches on RAW most weeks. If anything the only real purpose of this match was trying to get Diesel over. Finally, the match just has a lousy finish. 2/5 (and that's being generous) 123 Kid vs I.R.S was much more enjoyable (3/5).

    Bret Hart vs Jerry Lawler was a great match and the crowd was red hot for it. This is about the most over I've ever seen Bret. This was the most I've enjoyed a wrestling match in quite some time. A ridiculously underrated gem. Nothing on this show comes even close to this match. 4/5.

  4. #2824
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    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Hey. Quick question. Sorry if this has been asked before. Was reading through some of your 1998 WCW reviews and came across something that caught my interest.

    The British Bulldog w/Jim Neidhart vs Curt Hennig w/Rick Rude
    See if this makes sense. This is a continuation of the Hennig/Bret Hart feud. However, WCW is not legally able to have Bret, Bulldog, and Neidhart be together.
    Was there some bigger reason why they couldn't be together, or was it just pettiness on the part of McMahon?

  5. #2825

    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by ranthellacious View Post
    Hey. Quick question. Sorry if this has been asked before. Was reading through some of your 1998 WCW reviews and came across something that caught my interest.


    Was there some bigger reason why they couldn't be together, or was it just pettiness on the part of McMahon?
    Since Neidhart apparently was working the WWE without a contract in 1997, I assume it's solely because of Davey Boy Smith. Even though Bret's contract was going to be up in December 1997, Smith had just signed a new one with the WWE. In order to get out of the contract, I'm fairly sure it cost Bulldog a good amount of headache and likely came with some conditions. One such condition was that WCW couldn't just bring The Hart Foundation back together. Obviously, even if Bulldog's contract had expired and WCW were able to legally use The Hart Foundation, they wouldn't have been able to use that term since the WWE owned it, but in theory they could have just named them The Hart Legacy or The Dungeon or something similar. I do wonder if WCW could have done a new version of "The Hart Foundation" with say...Bret Hart, Jim Neidhart, Chris Benoit, and Chris Jericho though.

    To be honest, had Eric Bischoff cared about Smith and Neidhart, as opposed to just signing them for Bret, he probably could have found a way to allow the trio to be together.

    So was it pettiness? Maybe a tad, but it's also something Bulldog agreed on to get out of his contract. And god, what a mistake that was on Smith's part.

  6. #2826
    The Franchise.
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    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Based on what you know now, what will be of AEW in 5 years?

  7. #2827

    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Franchiser View Post
    Based on what you know now, what will be of AEW in 5 years?
    What do we know though? Seriously, we know practically nothing. We know for sure three things:

    - The owner has some money

    - A portion of the roster was revealed (With others rumored)

    - A random one off show, called Double or Nothing, is coming in May

    That's nothing. How can I, or anyone really, give even a reasonable guess for where the company will be in five years? We don't know if they're going to be a TV based company or just run monthly or whatever shows. We know that the owner has money, but how much money is he really willing to sink into the business? If they're going to score a TV deal, what channel is it going to be on? Right now, everything The Elite has done, has been a success, but now comes the point where they're going to have to deliver something bigger than just one show, that benefited greatly from being special due to it being an one off to prove that McMahon isn't the only one that can draw a house, and they're not going to have the ability of having that fresh alternative show feel since it's far more difficult to keep interest going rather than just creating it for one show.

    The time to really ask about expectations for five years in the future is no sooner than one year in existence. Even though it's highly unlikely that it's going to happen, in theory, it's possible that Double or Nothing could be the biggest bomb of 2019 and suddenly the idea that AEW will even be a thing at this point in 2020 is unlikely, let alone them being around in five years.

    To give you some semblance of an answer, 2019 is likely going to be a fucking amazing year for AEW, where it will be nonstop buzz for them and gaining new positives left and right. However, if they are going to be around in 2024, I'm sure there will be growing pains starting as early as 2020. The Elite are going to have some major successes and will undoubtedly have some failures. The best thing I can state for the future of AEW though is to manage your expectations. It's super easy to create a lot of buzz. TNA in 2010 had the buzz. There was buzz for MTV's Wrestling Society X in 2007. There was buzz for the launch of Lucha Underground. If AEW can be alive in five years and still have a buzz around them, that would be a good enough success.

  8. #2828
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    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Since Neidhart apparently was working the WWE without a contract in 1997, I assume it's solely because of Davey Boy Smith. Even though Bret's contract was going to be up in December 1997, Smith had just signed a new one with the WWE. In order to get out of the contract, I'm fairly sure it cost Bulldog a good amount of headache and likely came with some conditions.
    I remember reading that Bulldog had to pay 150k to buy out of his contract. I think this is mentioned in the Death of WCW book and in Bret Hart's book from 2007. Pretty sure Bruce Prichard said on STW that they were happy to let Bulldog go anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    One such condition was that WCW couldn't just bring The Hart Foundation back together. Obviously, even if Bulldog's contract had expired and WCW were able to legally use The Hart Foundation, they wouldn't have been able to use that term since the WWE owned it, but in theory they could have just named them The Hart Legacy or The Dungeon or something similar. I do wonder if WCW could have done a new version of "The Hart Foundation" with say...Bret Hart, Jim Neidhart, Chris Benoit, and Chris Jericho though.
    Holy shit. Can you imagine? WCW could've done an awesome Team Canada. It would've given Jericho something to do in 1999. Lance Storm eventually would've joined and he was great as the Team Canada leader in 2000. One of the few good things in WCW that year.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    To be honest, had Eric Bischoff cared about Smith and Neidhart, as opposed to just signing them for Bret, he probably could have found a way to allow the trio to be together.

    So was it pettiness? Maybe a tad, but it's also something Bulldog agreed on to get out of his contract. And god, what a mistake that was on Smith's part.
    WCW did tease a Hart Foundation reunion on an episode of Thunder in late 98, but instead Bulldog and Neidhart turned on Bret (or maybe it was the other way around and this was the start of Bret's heel turn) and all that came of it was a tag match in the main event of that Thunder and I think Luger was Bret's partner.

  9. #2829

    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by CptHowdy87 View Post
    WCW did tease a Hart Foundation reunion on an episode of Thunder in late 98, but instead Bulldog and Neidhart turned on Bret (or maybe it was the other way around and this was the start of Bret's heel turn) and all that came of it was a tag match in the main event of that Thunder and I think Luger was Bret's partner.
    It's a bit different from what you remember. On the September 10, 1998 edition of Thunder, Neidhart and Bulldog attacked Luger in a backstage segment. Later in the show, Luger worked a handicap match against both men. Since no one else from the Wolfpac was there that night, Luger didn't have anyone to rely on. That brought out Luger's current rival, Bret. The commentators played it up as if it'd be a three-on-one beat down, but Bret was quick to attack his family leading to an uneasy alliance between Bret and Luger. It was a really weird period as Bret had been heel for a few months, but for a couple of week stretch, he seemed to want to distance himself from Hogan and nWo Hollywood. It built up to the Bret/Hogan US Title match on Nitro at the end of September where Bret started the match, then got injured and was replaced with Sting, only to return at the end of the match to attack Sting to cause the match to go to no contest. It made little sense and wouldn't even be the last time that Bret faked drifting away from the nWo.

  10. #2830
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    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Assuming Ronda Vs Becky Vs Charlotte will be the biggest women's wrestling match in history if it main events mania, what womens match currently holds that honour of being the biggest?
    Last edited by Ed; 02-06-2019 at 07:42 AM.

  11. #2831

    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Ed View Post
    Assuming Ronda Vs Becky Vs Charlotte will be the biggest women's wrestling match in history if it main events mania, what womens match currently holds that honour of being the biggest?
    Safe bet is that it's a Joshi match. The individual show that stands out the most is the Tokyo Dome event from 1994 that lasted roughly 20 hours and featured Hokuto vs Kong in the main event. I know there were also various cage matches and hair vs hair that were huge deals for women wrestling.

    However, let's only look at US based women's wrestling since the Joshi stars brought in fans solely because of select match-ups rather than having the WWE machine behind them with the attendance of WM 35 being the same whether the women main event or not. Mind you, I'm also not knocking the WWE women because they're also going to potentially going to be main eventing a show with a shitload more fans watching in the building and will be generally more well known especially in the US. It's just tough to compare two very different aspects of women's wrestling like WWE and Joshi.

    With how women's wrestling was treated in America, the biggest women's match prior to WM 35 is likely something pretty recent. I'm thinking maybe Charlotte vs Sasha vs Becky from WM 32? There's probably a good half dozen recent WWE women's matches that could have a solid argument for being the biggest though.

  12. #2832
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    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    If you had to watch one of the following two matches, on repeat, for the rest of your life, which would it be?

    A) Sting vs. Hogan @ Starrcade 97

    Or

    B) Sting vs. HHH @ Wrestlemania 31


  13. #2833

    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
    If you had to watch one of the following two matches, on repeat, for the rest of your life, which would it be?

    A) Sting vs. Hogan @ Starrcade 97

    Or

    B) Sting vs. HHH @ Wrestlemania 31
    Admittedly, I've only watched Sting/Hunter once and that was during the PPV. My initial thought is to go with Hogan/Sting. It's not good, but it's a fascinating match and one that was really relevant. Not to mention, regardless of the screwiness, the right guy went over and the PPV ended on a really high note with the big WCW celebration. Hunter/Sting was incredibly irrelevant with the nWo (!!!) of all people coming out and fighting on Sting's side for WCW! The wrong guy went over with the two showing respect at the very end.

    Both were negatives for the shows that they were booked on, but give me the one that was relevant for that time period, not the one that was illogical and about 15 years too late.

  14. #2834

    Re: The Ask Jim Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Kintaro View Post
    Would Demolition reforming in 1992 work? Let’s just say Demolition face LOD at WM7 and lose. Crush then left in May 91. Let’s just say he gets injured for almost a year. Smash then goes singles(No Repo Man gimmick) and he teams with Kato whenever Tanaka isn’t available. Following WM8, Crush returns, he remains heel. Smash and Crush start teaming again. Kato continues to team with the group for 6 man tags as they are managed by Mr Fuji.

    Book Demolition(Smash and Crush) as a team right after WM8 up till The Rumble 93. Would you keep them as heels or would you turn them face at some point? Smash(Repo Man) left a few days before WM9 so either break the team up after the Rumble 93 and have the Smash vs Crush(under a new persona, Kona Crush) match at WM9. Or end their team at WM9 where they lose a tag match and then Crush goes solo and gets repackaged as Kona Crush. Totally up to you what route you want to take with Demolition. Looking forward to your ideas.
    This is going to be my sorriest excuse for a reply, but...while going through my Google Drive, I came across an incomplete outline of this Demolition BTB question. I thought about just deleting it, but since the outline is pretty complete except for the ending, I don't think this question would take too much time to finish it off. Obviously, it's been an entire year, so if you no longer have any desire to read my answer, I get it. But who knows, maybe at least one person would be curious.

    So, since I can't remember all of the details I was going to include, since I literally created the Google Drive doc in mid March 2018, I'm going to be showing a portion of the outline in quote form, giving some 2019 Jim comments to explain it, show the next portion, comment on that, and just continue until 2019 Jim needs to fully step in and give an ending to this BTB question that 2018 Jim failed to do. Fuck you, 2018 Jim.

    Wrestlemania 7
    The Legion of Doom def Demolition w/Mr. Fuji

    Mr. Fuji starts booking Demolition as singles stars

    SNME 29
    Jim Neidhart def Crush w/Mr. Fuji - Crush injured

    Summerslam Spectacular
    Jim Neidhart def Smash
    Ricky Steamboat, Kerry Von Erich, and Davey Boy Smith def The Orient Express w/Mr. Fuji - Power and Glory & Warlord injured Von Erich

    Summerslam 1991
    Jim Duggan def Smash w/Mr. Fuji
    Ricky Steamboat, Davey Boy Smith, and Jim Neidhart def Power & Glory and The Warlord w/Slick after Roma is pinned
    This is all of the set-up and Demolition Smash showcasing his failures as a client of Mr. Fuji. It's now a few months after Demolition Ax left, they fail to get back into the tag team titles picture, and they lose the program against LOD at Wrestlemania 7. From there, it's about bringing Smash and Slick's stable together due to common enemies. In this case, it's simply built around Neidhart. Neidhart took the tag titles from Demolition at Summerslam 1990, injured Crush to remove Crush for a year, and then when Kerry Von Erich is injured, is brought into the fold to join Slick's rivals in a successful effort at Summerslam 1991. Ultimately though, Smash is realizing that Fuji is bringing zero success to Demolition in their second time together and Slick recognizing that his attempts to bring success to his stable is hindered by Paul Roma.

    Slick fires Roma

    Slick signs Smash after months of neglect by Fuji

    Survivor Series 1991
    Smash, The Warlord, Hercules, Big Bully Busick w/Slick def Jim Neidhart, Kerry Von Erich, Owen Hart, and British Bulldog

    The British Bulldog power slammed Slick out of the WWE

    #1 Contender’s Tag Team Tournament
    The New Foundation def Smash/The Warlord- First Round
    The Natural Disasters def The New Foundation - Semi-Finals - Smash/Warlord interfere, Neidhart injured

    Wrestlemania 8
    Owen Hart def Smash w/The Warlord
    Immediately after Summerslam 1991, the two stories pre-Summerslam comes together with Smash replacing Roma in Slick's stable and forms a tag team with The Warlord. Apparently I didn't give them an actual tag team name. So let's come up with one right now. Smash and The Warlord becomes The Demo(n)s of Pain~! Sounds scary, right? So now with Demons of Pain as Slick's main team and Hercules transitioned into being the singles wrestler in the group. Thins initially look brilliant for Smash as Slick's stable (along with Harvey Wippleman's Big Bully Busick) are successful against Slick's rivals of Neidhart, Von Erich, and Bulldog (Along with the recently debuting Owen Hart, stated as Anvil's brother-in-law). Tragedy happens though as Slick is power slammed out of the WWE, just like it happened in reality. Due to his connections with Slick, Wippleman takes on Hercules as a new client, but The Demo(n)s of Pain opting not to sign with him, causing them to be on their own. Despite not having a manager, The Demo(n)s of Pain continue their war against The New Foundation (Owen/Neidhart). Without Slick, The Demo(n)s of Pain fails to realize their potential and their only real success comes from fucking over The New Foundation and causing Neidhart to be injured and gone from the company. The initial teased Wrestlemania match between The New Foundation vs The Demo(n)s of Pain instead just becomes Smash vs Owen with Smash promising to finally end this war against The Hart Family that had been going on since Summerslam 1990. Instead, Owen bests Smash by lucking into a roll-up just as he beat Skinner at Wrestlemania 8.

    Crush returns to join Smash in turning on the Warlord, sending Warlord out of the WWE

    Feud with Owen Hart and new partner, Koko B. Ware

    Summerslam 1992
    Demolition def High Energy

    Survivor Series 1992
    Money Inc, The Beverly Brothers, Demolition, and The Headshrinkers vs The Nasty Boys, The Natural Disasters, High Energy, and The Bushwhackers
    Can you tell that this is the portion where I really hit the wall in terms of creativity? I didn't even finish it!

    The idea is that after a solid year of disappointments, Smash seemingly gains a bright light in terms of Crush able to finally return after Wrestlemania 8. Since The Demo(n)s of Pain failed to work out, mostly because the brains of the operation, Slick, was hurt so soon after they were put together, Smash was able to rationalize that Warlord is holding him back and he quickly joins back up with Crush.

    The problem is that I kinda like the idea of The Demo(n)s of Pain. Is it because the name is kinda rad? Well duh, but I still like it. So instead, I'm going to change it some. Crush returns to the WWE after Wrestlemania 8 and yet again becomes the third member of a tag team, this time as a member of The Demo(n)s of Pain. Crush becomes the mind of the trio opting to focus on other matters rather than just winning the tag titles. For starters, there's the issue of Owen Hart. Even with Owen joining up with a new partner of Koko B. Ware, The Demo(n)s of Pain are constantly interfering in their matches, preventing High Energy from gaining any sort of momentum. So while that's helping their ego and making them look like some monsters, Crush also strikes a deal with Jimmy Hart to essentially be an early 90s version of The APA where they're being paid to be goons to go after any of Money Inc's threats to the tag team titles. This includes matches against the likes of The Natural Disasters and The Legion of Doom. Since The Demo(n)s of Pain aren't too concerned with victories, they're not always winning, but they are always leaving the match on their feet while their opponents are hurt on the mat. Case in point is that at Summerslam, Money Inc defeated LOD in LOD's final WWE match thanks to the fact that Hawk and Animal went into the PPV at less than 100% thanks to The Demo(n)s of Pain. This continues for the rest of the year until Crush stands up for The Demo(n)s of Pain and starts to demand far more money out of Jimmy Hart due to this overwhelming help. Money Inc balks at the idea and Crush retaliates with a threat of The Demo(n)s of Pain coming after the WWE Tag Team Titles if it means they're not being paid to be Money Inc's goons since like...they gotta make that money, you hear?

    It builds up to Royal Rumble 1993 with Crush and Smash representing The Demo(n)s of Pain against Money Inc. Money Inc's year long title reign continues as The Warlord turns on The Demo(n)s of Pain all because Money Inc had the bright idea of not offering all three members of The Demo(n)s of Pain the extra money, but instead offering The Warlord a larger chunk than he would have received even had The Demo(n)s of Pain been paid the extra money. Does that even make sense? Money Inc saved money, but Warlord scored more money. So at this point, Crush is ready to go to war with Money Inc and The Warlord, but Smash snaps and turns on Crush in the aftermath of Royal Rumble. For Smash, he put all of his trust into Crush's decision making for the last year and now The Demo(n)s of Pain aren't being paid the extra money from Money Inc and aren't receiving the extra money that they would have made from being the WWE Tag Team Champions. To make matters worse, losing The Warlord and being humiliated by Jimmy Hart caused The Demo(n)s of Pain to lose that fear factor that they had built up. After years of failures, Smash is now putting it all on Crush. Maybe Smash changes up his look a bit reflect his new attitude. Crush returns after a few weeks debuting his Kona Crush gimmick. The Demo(n)s of Pain are officially dead. Crush challenges Smash to a match at Wrestlemania 9, but after Smash initially refused, Crush talked him into it by putting his career on the line. Jack Tunney makes it official with a career vs career match, much to Smash's surprise.

    Finally, at WM 9, Crush squashes Smash with Smash's six year WWE career coming to an end.

    Flash forward 14 years and The Demo(n)s of Pain make their one weekend return with Crush, Smash, and Warlord teaming up in CHIKARA's first ever King of Trios tournament in 2007.

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